Tag Archives: aircraft carrier

U.S. Navy and back to the future Star Power

Flash: the U.S. Navy plans return to teaching celestial navigation. In my view, this is one of the smarter moves the Navy is making to ensure its ability to safely navigate no matter what and no matter where. In the early 1960s, at OCS, we learned the basics of both piloting and celestial navigation in … Continue reading U.S. Navy and back to the future Star Power

Cold War Dark Operations: Soot, as a weapon? Revenge of the Snipes in the Cold War

When the Cuban Missile Crisis began to heat up in September 1962, the ROOSEVELT (CVA 42) had just left NS Mayport for its umpteenth Med deployment. The newly married JO’s (junior officers) would gather on the fan tail to watch the wake that pointed towards the brides they had left.  Misty eyes were the uniform … Continue reading Cold War Dark Operations: Soot, as a weapon? Revenge of the Snipes in the Cold War

The In-Port Watch on a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier in the Sixties

Author’s note: this “blog” was actually written in 1963 while I was the Asst. Navigator for the USS F. D. ROOSEVELT (CVA-42).  It is dedicated to friends who also served in ROOSEVELT and have stood this same watch, including: Bill Brinkley, Paul Dickson and Steve Wood. Shoes shined, lint off uniform, tie straight, buttons buttoned, … Continue reading The In-Port Watch on a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier in the Sixties

Carrier Captain’s Night Orders: “Call Me…”

The Captain’s Night Orders are directives prepared by Commanding Officers for watch standers regarding the safety of the ship when they are not on the bridge, typically when they are resting or asleep. U.S. Navy Regulations require Commanding Officers to prepare instructions for the Officer of the Deck who will be responsible for the navigation … Continue reading Carrier Captain’s Night Orders: “Call Me…”

Memories of the Fru Dee Roo

We were “the stick” in case the “talk softly” part was not successful. When the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV A-42) was towed toward the oblivion of the scrap yard in 1978, she consisted of some 65,000 tons of obsolete steel and equipment–but she left many more tons of memories with the tens of thousands … Continue reading Memories of the Fru Dee Roo